Our Amsterdam moments

Cycles, canals, cheese, art and more! When one hears about a certain famous Dutch city, many things might come to mind. For our curious group—having never visited Amsterdam before—we were excited to explore a bit.

The planned main attraction for our day was the fantastic Van Gogh Museum, but our out-and-about discoveries were wonderful in their own right. Eager to see the famed artist’s work first however, we started there…

Spiraling up

The museum. Four of us, in search of our favorite paintings, headed eagerly toward the open-air stairway, winding our way up to the official first floor of the main building. Once there, we fell into the slow line of museum attendees, moving clockwise around the inner walls of the room.

Stopping long enough in front of each showcased canvas to admire and wonder, we encountered our first unexpected discovery: The Potato Eaters.

This darkly toned portrayal of a poor family sitting down to a meal of potatoes pulled from our group a collective reaction of a little sadness, mixed with a bit of sympathy, followed by our surprise reaction: hunger! Suddenly we were hungry for potatoes, and maybe some wine as well, to wash them all down…

As we made our way around floors 1, 2 and 3, I was impressed at being able to see his masterpieces—like his self portrait (the one featured on the museum’s pamphlet)—up close.

Our other Van Gogh group favorites leaned toward the flower category: Almond Blossoms, Sunflowers and Irises.

After completing our circle of the third floor, it was time to find our own travel sized replicas to take home. We headed to the gift shop on the main floor, and found several portable souvenirs.

The museum held one more fun surprise for us: a cafeteria—one of the best I’ve seen—displaying bags of potato chips, next to (of all things) a wine-by-the-glass dispenser! We gladly selected our treats and found a table. With our potato/wine craving satisfied—what are the odds?!—we made our way outside…

Floating down

The canals. Bordering streets, homes, businesses and parks, Amsterdam’s waterways are as much a traffic medium as its roadways for moving people around the town. Pre booked, we boarded our vessel for a mini canal cruise.

Time for a pop quiz! Over how many kilometers of canals are in Amsterdam?

  • 50
  • 75
  • 100

Answer? Over 100 kilometers of canals—and more than 1500 bridges.

What a fantastic way to see the sights! Navigating the narrow canals, we enjoyed observing the building facades, and other waterside attractions, up close.

Wheeling around

The most bicycle-friendly capital city in the world, Amsterdam’s urban population of 1 million plus means that bicycles are everywhere. Pedestrians beware! While walking around, we kept a vigilant eye on the noted bike paths.

In the mood for a different kind of wheel, we stepped into the Amsterdam Cheese Deli. Samples, sandwiches and several savory flavors of my absolute favorite dairy product were everywhere! Unable to resist, I picked a wedge of Gouda. Good. Stuff… 🧀

Known for lots of activities and consumables that aren’t exactly legal most places elsewhere, Amsterdam has it all. In broad daylight. In shops that stand alongside other more

mainstream businesses. Not our thing, but a curiously entertaining observation for us nonetheless as we strolled up and down the canal bridges and sidewalks.

All in all, we loved our day of Amsterdam moments—every art-filled, oddball, scenic and tasty bit of it. J 🥔🍷

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Angling Antwerp’s alleyways

When craving things like great chocolate, tasty beer, ginormous waffles and a little printing press history in a walk-friendly town, where might one go? On a gorgeous day in Belgium, I suggest Antwerp.

Normally I wouldn’t combine any of those items together (except for maybe the chocolate and waffles), but they all came together quite nicely on a sunny Autumn day in this beautiful city.

We began mid-morning with a short, simple list of items to see—things that might stereotype Belgium—but wanted to experience anyway. And we were hoping to do so on foot, so we’d feel a little less guilty about consuming the chocolate (and waffles and beer).

Using a simple paper map, we started in the direction of a museum that holds a collection of rare books and typesetting history. Within minutes, we found our first stop…

The museum

The map, leading us through ever-narrowing and angled streets, guided us successfully to the Plantin-Moretus Museum. The only museum in the world on the UNESCO World Heritage list, I was surprised to discover that its 16th century typesetting equipment and 30 thousand very old books are housed today in… well… the family home.

The wealthy Plantin-Moretus family lived in this three-story structure that spanned nearly a city block, which includes a large, beautiful courtyard complete with an herb garden and a sundial. And, of course, lots and lots of shops for their printing business.

Making our way around the leather-paneled rooms, we marveled at the ornate fixtures, fancy furnishings and sheer volume of gadgets—items they put to work designing, printing, binding—and selling—books: scholastic, hymnal, fictional—any information the family determined to be knowledge worth sharing and selling.

The writer in me was geeking out! Our family bookworm was loving the library too, as well the as countless printed materials on display. One family member was reminded of a time when she worked at her hometown newspaper’s printing press. Lots of similarities and memories…

The square

In the town’s square, at the base of the Our Lady Cathedral, rests a statue of a seemingly sleeping boy (no pun intended) and his dog. The legend of Nello and Patrasche are immortalized under a blanket of white bricks, enjoyed and marveled at by all passers by. This became our second stop of the day as we wound our way around this old part of the city in search of our desired refreshments.

What a fantastic square! Along with all the shops and eateries, we also discovered that this area is off limits to vehicles. This is a huge plus for tourists like ourselves who can’t seem to stop gazing around, despite the possible traffic hazards. This particular feature made it easy for us to find the perfect restaurant: De Troubadour.

The treats

The sign above De Troubadour reads BROODJES WAFELS. Later, I learned that “broodjes” is Dutch word for sandwich, but we knew right away what “wafles” meant: lunch!

Seated outside, we enjoyed not only waffles with cherries and chocolate sauce, but also beer, hot chocolate with a dome of whipped cream and pancakes with marmalade.

The service was excellent too—the owner even set up a table umbrella for us (when he noticed the sun was just so), and very kindly answered all of our touristy questions. Most definitely we enjoyed our perfectly sweet meal.

Wanting to have a few treats to take away, we took a few steps from our fantastic restaurant to two stores labeled: BELGIAN CHOCOLATES and BELGIAN BEERS & BREWS. (It’s like they know us!)

Upon closer inspection, the true name of the chocolate shop revealed itself: Nello. Inside, I found just what I was looking for: small bags of dark chocolate truffles, individually wrapped caramels for sharing with friends, and something I didn’t know I needed until I saw it.

That’s right, a large Belgian chocolate Rice Krispy treat in the shape of a hockey puck. Theeee absolute most delicious treat ever! Looking back, I should have purchased more than one, as sharing is overrated…

Right next door, Abby No. 8 (the BEER shop), provided our daughter with a couple of souvenir bottles—her list item. We found friendly and helpful service at both stores, which rounded out our visit quite nicely.

Leaving the square, we meandered our way through more alleys and shops, enjoying the window displays and making an additional purchase or two.

We really had fun checking off our eclectic collection of list items in Antwerp. However, the next time I visit, I’m heading straight to Nello, making a beeline for the Rice Krispy treats, and buying waaaaaaay more than just one… J 🍫

 

Monet’s garden palette

Color. Vibrant, natural, seasonal and beautiful, especially when it takes the shape of a thriving garden. Add to that a little sunshine, a babbling brook, a picturesque pond and a few chirping birds. Now place this Eden just in front of lovely chateau in the French countryside, and violà! You have arrived at the home of Claude Monet.

Famous for his paintings and synonymous with Impressionism, Monet crafted many a canvas with the serene scenes found in his own garden. A world traveler, he took inspiration from far-and-away places, but always came home to paint his own outdoor collection of flowers, trees and water features that happily came to life via his palette.

Approaching the entrance, I began to wonder: what was I looking forward to the most? Seeing his pond’s signature green bridge? Finding towering seasonal sunflowers? His paintings—up close—or the place he called home? I quickly came to realize I was looking forward to seeing anything Monet…

The garden

We started with the path to the pond. Bright green and Autumn colored plants marked several photo ops as we headed down to a passageway, then over to the water garden area. Our group split up, in part due to the flow of people, but also due to the many camera stops we each made.

Walking counterclockwise around the pond, we could see the green bridge from many angles. Beautiful and serene despite the slight overgrowth, it was a treat to see this Monet symbol up close.

Continuing on toward his home, we discovered a crisscross pattern of pathways between the pond and the chateau, creating garden sectionals.

Each section seemed to compete with the next for our cameras’ attention, and yet the gardens themselves waited patiently for their many admirers to take it all in. But the one area that impressed me the most was the large pathway (off limits to visitors) leading directly to Monet’s front door.

Blankets of ground cover and wildly colorful floral arrangements climbing their way up the green “walls” and wire arches met my eyes—and stopped me in my tracks. Taking it all in, I stayed there for as long as I dared, my eyes (and my camera) loving every second.

The home

Breaking myself away from the beauty outside, it was time to discover the colors and styles inside…

Just as bright and colorful as his gardens, Monet’s chateau welcomed its visitors into each room, taking care to display many of his paintings and home furnishings in accessible fashion.

I especially loved the room featuring some of his works—canvases showcasing the very gardens we just enjoyed outside.

The foodies in our group really got a kick out of his kitchen: bright copper cookware lined the main wall of blue and white tiles; simply beautiful!

The neighborhood

Although there is a well appointed and large gift shop at his house, I found a gorgeous scarf at one of the many delightful stores just behind Monet’s property.

Rustic, yet bright and well maintained, the country style homes and shops felt warm and welcoming. I could have easily spent hours wandering through these narrow, quiet streets. Ah, but it was time for lunch!

The countryside

Breathtaking in its own right, this little corner of the Normandy region is a rolling display of hills, fields, Autumn trees and meandering streams. And, as we discovered, home to a restaurant that complements its surroundings perfectly: Le Moulin de Fourges.

Plated in a simple but elegant style, we enjoyed our salads, chicken, mashed potatoes and dessert (apple torte!) with four choices of the world famous French beverage: wine.

Bottled water and coffee helped round out our drink selection. And we couldn’t resist purchasing a few bottles of our table favorites to enjoy back in our room (or home, if they’d make it that far)…

There was even a local artist selling his paintings just outside the entrance. Travel sized, we picked up two.

The city nearby

Saint Joan of Arc, considered the heroine of France, met her demise in this region. A modern church now stands on the grounds where she was burned at the stake. It was here that we found ourselves surrounded by one of the quaintest towns we’d encountered all day: Rouen.

Our first official stop here—the cathedral. With construction spanning several centuries, the many styles of this mammoth structure (everything from medieval gothic to ornate renaissance) came together quietly to form a towering yet inviting place of worship for its community.

Both outside and in, the decisive lines and long-lean aisles purposefully placed into its walls, windows and flooring drew our eyes toward the alters and ornate ceilings, then back down to ourselves.

The Rouen Cathedral somewhat divides the more modern sectors of the town from the older structures and near our next stop: the calendar clock.

More than just the days of the week or the month, this time keeper also displays the phases of the moon. Beautiful and functional, and not too far from the ground, which made its face very easy to see.

Ready for a beverage, we stepped into J.M.’s Café. Freshly refueled by our caffeinated drinks, we were energized enough to round out our afternoon with a walk through the nearby square and its many shops.

Our time in the Normandy countryside was a most enjoyable one, full of color and flavor and the fresh crispness of Autumn. But my favorite discovery of the day (if I must narrow my choice down to only one) would be seeing the wild garden pathway to Monet’s front door. A very inspiring moment I will treasure for a very-very-very long time. J 🎨

 

Under London

I ❤️ London—it’s an amazing city showcasing centuries of history, layered in royalty, exploration and culture. World famous landmarks like the London Bridge and Big Ben dot the skyline.

And London is big. Big, wide and deep. Stairs, tunnels, The Tube—even The Chunnel—carry you down, down, down, then all around. So, while there is much to see all over this town, there’s plenty to discover just below its surface. Recently we decided to spend a day recovering from jet lag by visiting a few places under London.

Medieval cells

“Thrown in the Clink” is a popular and somewhat flip expression describing a guilty party’s new residence: behind the many locked doors and iron bars of a prison. But did you know The Clink is an actual place? Well, it was…

Back in the day—way back from 1144 to 1780—a series of prisons existed near and along Clink Street. Why this specific site? The first such prison in the area opened in 1127. No more than a cellar, it belonged to the Palace of the Bishop of Winchester.

Over the next five centuries, hundreds of debtors, assorted criminals, religious martyrs and would-be witches spent time (and most likely their lives) in “the Clink.”

Today, a small wall is all that remains from the original facility, housed in The Clink Prison Museum. Near the London Bridge, this modern day nod to The Clink features many medieval devices used to restrain prisoners, as well as themed decor and sounds that set the tone. Entering the museum, we walked down into the awaiting and dark bit of London’s history…

The walls displayed easy-to-read placards, corresponding with nearby weapons and tools of a featured era, telling the stories of prison life and politics. A little like a haunted house, our self-guided tour took about 40 minutes. A quick “sentence,” compared to that of its former occupants.

Transportation tunnel

“Mind the gap” is a message painted along the edge of the subway platform, reminding all passengers to watch their step when The Tube doors open.

London cabbies are friendly and knowledgeable, and the red double decker buses are a fun, easy way to get around town. Still, my favorite way to shortcut the streets of this famous city is underground.

Making our way from The Clink to Camden Market, we headed down the nearest subway entrance—trusty Oyster cards in hand—exiting a mere 15 minutes later at our stop: Camden Town.

Tea in a basement

Next door to Regents Canal in Historic Central London, Camden Market features over 1000 unique shops, eateries and points of interest. Its own history is quite young, dating back only to the 1970s.

As the area’s industrial commodity (gin production) phased out, the music and fashion scene blossomed, growing into the diverse and contemporary gathering place it is today.

Approaching mid afternoon, we found ourselves ready for one of my favorite mealtimes: Afternoon Tea. And what better place to discover a modern twist to this time honored tradition than in a sub level shop: The Basement Tea Rooms.

Ready to take in our group of six, the Tea Room staff seated us at a fun low table, shopping options just an arm length away: sweaters, shoes, books—you name it!

Very reasonably priced, our tea, sandwiches and treats were fresh and delicious. Our casual traveler attire felt right at home here.

Stuffed after our delicious meal, it was time to sleep off our food coma back at our hotel. And despite the jet lag, we truly enjoyed our underground adventure.

What’s your favorite way to warm up to a different time zone? Well, when in London, I’ll head down under… J 🕳

 

Las Vegas lite

A weekend in Las Vegas? Sure! Help celebrate a few extended family birthdays? Of course—happy to! Only—I’ve never been. To Vegas. And I’m not much of a gambler. Or a partier.

So, what does one like me (of the low-key variety) do for entertainment? As it turns out, there’s something for everyone in Las Vegas—lots and lots of somethings…

Sin city sips

Chocolate is an easy sell for me. So is New York City. And so is Death By Chocolate, the martini styled chocolate drink I enjoyed with a few of my travel companions at The Chocolate Bar, two steps away from The Hershey Store at New York New York Resort & Casino.

A Las Vegas nod to The Big Apple, this resort features a little bit of everything one would associate with NYC: the Statue of Liberty, Time Square, the many burrows and that infamous skyline—but with a roller coaster weaving inside and out—just in case you forgot which New York you’re visiting.

Signature seasoning

As a youngster, Lawry’s Seasoning was a staple in my mom’s kitchen pantry. We enjoyed many a meal with Lawry’s enhancing the flavors of our food. I had no idea there would be an entire prime rib dinner restaurant by the same company awaiting our birthday celebration!

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A savory supper place…

This wonderful dining room features formal table side prime rib carving and tossed salad, along with some of the best service I’ve ever experienced at a bar and restaurant. Nothing was over-seasoned; all flavors were just right.

Also, I enjoyed reading the history of this flavorful company posted near their hostess podium. (Oh, and for anyone not interested in prime rib, there are other options on the menu.) A little bit of nostalgia mixed in with great food and wonderful service made for a very enjoyable dining experience.

Stars of the sea

A shark dive in the ocean? No. Not really my thing. Sharks within inches of my face—a thick, clear aquarium wall between us? Yes! Much more my thing. The Shark Reef Aquarium and Polar Journey at Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino features not only sharp-tooth swimming predators, but several species of underwater critters. Many tropical (and polar) land-based critters as well call this aquarium home.

Exploring this venue was the perfect activity for our entire group, ranging in age from seven to seventy-seven. All of us enjoyed watching the quiet grace and beauty of the sea life gliding before us, above us (and below) as they swam into our line of sight.

Lots of posted information, as well as a highly trained and experienced staff, answered all our questions. Queries like: “What’s the difference between venom and poison?” Or, “How do Stingrays eat?” We also learned that a Jellyfish is not really a fish.

Surreal stage

Calling “O” a stage show would be like calling Amsterdam a canal city. Both are sooooooo much more.

Cirque du Soleil’s “O” at the Bellagio Resort & Casino is beyond amazing. The performers sore, dance, swim—even dive—their way on-in-above (and below) the actual stage. The colors, costumes and scenery harmonize with the music to create a show unlike any other.

The stadium-like theater and tiered seating areas gave everyone an excellent and unobstructed view. This feature was most helpful, as there was usually more than one act in progress at any one time. Truly mesmerizing, this show was worth every penny. I would love to see it again!

Tuscany tease

Across the street from Lawry’s sits our hotel for the weekend: the Tuscany Suites & Casino. Hosting a convention attended by one of our family members, this place of lodging isn’t bedazzled like many a famous hotel on the strip.

It did however provide us with clean and spacious rooms, and a decent place to meet for breakfast: Marilyn’s. Understated but less expensive than many others in the area, we were comfortable here.

Next-time notes

Upon learning about our Vegas trip, many friends and family members gave us the following recommendations—places we ran out of time for, so they’ll just have to wait for a return visit:

Ziplining—over old Las Vegas! I love ziplining, so this event is definitely on my “next time” list.

Breakfast at The Egg Slut. The menu looks fantastic! And let’s face it—the name cracks me up.

Cosmopolitan hotel hair styling bar—because I’ve always wanted someone to serve me wine while having my hair styled…

I even dropped a dollar in a slot machine at the airport. Did I win anything? Let’s just say the city of Las Vegas is a dollar richer, thanks to me.

We really did have a great time visiting this surreal desert town. Maybe next time, I’ll get my dollar back. J 🎲 🎲

 

a-MAiZE-ingly FUNd day!

Harvest time—‘tis the season to be

  1. shopping freshly picked—beautiful—fruits and veggies
  2. falling in love with the red, orange and yellow leaved trees
  3. Getting lost in Bob’s Corn giant 10-acre corn maze

A dear friend of mine, one of Bob’s Corn employees, says that she doesn’t go to work; she goes to play. Driving tractors, giving tours, picking corn and just being outside… it’s too much fun to be called work!

I just had to see this place for myself. Lucky for us, my family and I were able to time our visit to this farm with a very special occasion: the memorial 5K fun run, Adventures of a Lumberjack.

Located in the town of Snohomish, Bob’s Corn honors the memory of Alex, a former employee and local high school athlete, with this annual scholarship fund event.

The course

Because this was our first visit to Bob’s Corn, the 5K gave us an excellent opportunity to take a walking tour (of sorts) around the property.

The start-finish line was just outside the Country Store. Set up to be a little like an obstacle course, our path lead us between the farm’s buildings and around the corn fields, then across the street via an underpass.

Signs and guides were posted along the way, helping us continue on the designated route. Pumpkin patches, wooded trails and sunflower fields provided beautiful backdrops to our course. But the “obstacle” that actually gave me a bit of trouble was the one that got stuck in my hair… 🐝

In the end, my noggin took on three stingers. A friend helped dislodge the flyer still tangled in my ponytail, and the race EMT at the finish line, along with my daughter, removed the mini daggers from my scalp.

Just prior to the race, Alex’s former cross country coach let everyone know that—in the spirit of competition—Alex wouldn’t want the race to be too easy. So, while bees were not an intentional obstacle, they served as an interesting reminder to me that obstacles can pop up anywhere (and any time), falling in the category of “when you least expect it…” 🙃

The fields

  • Not just fields but walls of corn, eight feet tall!
  • Rows and rows and more rows of sunflowers, soaking up rays of light.
  • Or how about a 40-acre u-pick pumpkin patch featuring over 60 types of pumpkins to give your eyes a treat?

Along the race course, I couldn’t help stopping to take a photo or two (or more) of these gorgeous crops.

Also, there’s a fenced-in playground field for the little ones, and a big slide that could take adults. Nothing small about this place.

The store

Open mid-July to the end of October, the Country Store sells the farm’s fresh produce, fresh dairy products, fruit preserves and pickled eggs and veggies. So many different flavors!

Honey items, handmade soaps, tractor toys, even sweatshirts and T-shirts featuring the farm logo. Lots of other specialty items too.

Along with 13 ears of corn, we left with fresh eggs, pickled items, preserves, and yes, a tractor toy…

After the race, The Dancing Wick Candle Company sold their Lumberjack candles, featuring a scent designed especially for this 5K event. Such a wonderful fragrance! I picked up two.

I can see why my friend has so much fun working at Bob’s Corn. I’ve come to think of it as an agricultural playland.

Before the season ends, I’ll be back for Halloween pumpkins, more Country Store items (early holiday shopping!), and a walk through the infamous maze; but maybe this time I’ll wear a hat… 🐝🌽 😁

 

Farming the sky

Ah… the sound of the wind as it rustles leaves, sways tree branches and orchestrates melodies on decorative chimes. Sometimes fierce and sometimes subtle, this element fills sails. It symbolizes change. It means business.

Windmills, historically common fixtures of countryside landscapes all over the world, have serviced single homes and farms for centuries. Pumping water or milling grain, these infamous symbols of agriculture use the wind to get the job done.

Wind turbines, first entering the history books in 1887, were built to produce—then “bank” electricity—a storable commodity that would help power the needs of entire communities. Talk about an industrial revolution!

Harvesting the wind

About 16 miles east of the city of Ellensburg, in view of I 90, I found Wild Horse Wind Facility. Surrounded by hills and sage brush—and wind—this PSE location collects electricity from 149 wind turbines.

I timed my visit to the facility’s Renewable Energy Center for the 10:00 am tour. Free to the public—my favorite price!—our guide walked us through the informational displays inside the center before we stepped outside.

All “dolled up” in our hard hats and protective eyewear, we made our way to an area just behind the building where we found wind turbine components (conveniently located at ground level for tour purposes) and solar panels. Wait—what? Solar panels?

Focusing on not just one but two forms of renewable energy resources, Wild Horse uses electricity generated by these panels to power all of PSE’s facilities on this 10,880 acre property.

Time for a pop quiz! How tall is each Wild Horse wind turbine?

  • 132 feet
  • 287 feet
  • 351 feet

Answer: holding three blades measuring 128 feet each, the turbine itself measures 351 feet high. That’s about as tall as a 32 story building! The Vestas V80 Megawatt Wind Turbine needs a wind speed between 9-56 MPH to produce electricity. (To conserve its own energy, the turbine powers down and the blades stop in low or no wind.)

Pitching and turning to accommodate wind speed and direction, each turbine generates enough electricity to power—on the average—400 homes. If the wind speed is at least 28 MPH, 1200 homes would receive this resource.

Approaching #C2—the tour’s designated turbine on the property—I realized that the sound produced by each wind machine was little more than a hum. According to our guide, only about 50 decibels each. In terms of audibility, it was like walking among a row of very quiet automatic dishwashers.

However, what truly impressed me on the tour was learning just how much PSE puts into studying the area. Wildlife (in the air and on the ground), the terrain, local farms and ranches—even cultural and historical aspects of this place—are researched and honored when determining design and placement of equipment and other facilities.

For example, local tribes have access to roots dug for culinary and ceremonial or medicinal purposes. Understanding the flight path of birds and bats helps PSE with placement of the turbines, keeping the avian mortality rate from such devices the lowest in the country. In fact, the greatest nemesis for birds in our nation is not a wind turbine. Cats, buildings and cars win that unfortunate statistic.

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Inexpensive, generating electricity via the wind is pennies per kilowatt; it’s a little cheaper than solar generated electricity. Renewable and efficient too…

Milling the grain

Taking a step back in time, my next power stop was just a few miles away in the little town of Thorp. At the Thorp Grist Mill, a national historic landmark, I discovered another clean-energy way to generate electricity. In the 1880s, a water turbine at this mill did more than turn wheat into flour. It also provided this town with electricity; one of the first towns in Central Washington to benefit from such a resource.

By the way, do you know how flour is made? At this mill, grain entered at ground level, rode in small buckets attached to conveyor belts all the way to the third floor, then was dumped into chutes, making its way to the lower floors. Machines resembling large wooden cabinets broke apart the husks, then milled the kernels multiple times until they became the consistency of, well… flour.

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Enjoying the bounty

Ready to enjoy fresh and local produce and baked goods—a little something the nearby wind farm helped make? I was! My last stop for the afternoon: the Thorp Fruit and Antique Mall. It’s a big produce stand that’s kind of hard to miss…

Three floors of local treasures: fruits and veggies great you as you walk in the entrance, taking up most of the space on level 1. Also on that same floor, you’ll find a wine section (Washington state, in case you don’t already know, is the second largest producer of premium wines in the nation), along with other gourmet local items, and an espresso counter. Coffee break time for me!

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The two upstairs floors feature items any antique or vintage shopper would gladly peruse. Very walkable with plenty of natural light, this country store is an easy place to shop. Too easy…

As I made my way home, I saw these renewable resources in a whole new light. I’ve always appreciated clean, efficient ways to power our world, but knowing the harmony PSE—this local company—pursues in caring for its physical place on the map (and the surrounding communities), makes me feel a little better about our corner of the world.

It takes a lot to keep the lights on. Nice to know the impact of wind farming on our world, helping with electricity and more, is a positive one. J 🌬