Historical Astoria

I love a crisp autumn day—fiery leaves aiming for the ground under a blue sky, the cool air challenging the sun’s warmth on our faces.

But enjoying this time of year is even more fun while exploring a few special places in a picturesque seaside town. One such place I recently paid a visit to: Astoria.

Originally one of the oldest settlements on the West Coast—named after John Jacob Astor—this Oregon jewel carefully preserves its amazing past, proudly sharing it with today’s visitors. Just passing through for the day, my husband and I fancied a walk and made a stop or two…

Back in time

The first noticeable—very picturesque—feature in this coastal-river town is only 50 years old: the Astoria-Megler Bridge. Surprisingly, this pair of small towns is home to one of the longest truss bridges in the nation.

Replacing a ferry system that was always hampered by crazy currents, fog and other weather-related challenges, this attractive span does its part to connect two states, along with a road that connects three countries. Not bad for 1966! We could see it from just about anywhere in town; it likes to photobomb…

Tea time

What does a successful local river bar pilot and businessman do for retirement? Build an 11,000+ square foot Victorian home of course! Captain George Flavel wanted something stylish that he and his family could enjoy, entertain, relax and come home to after visiting the world. Sporting 12-14’ ceilings on the first two floors (and in the basement), I’d say they enjoyed plenty of elbow room…

Now maintained by the Clatsop County Historical Society (and on the National Register of Historic Places), this beautiful structure known as the Flavel House entertains visitors from all over the world. And if you’re up for tea and scones (like me—always!), I suggest booking a tour…

Entering through the front door, we were escorted to the dining room and conservatory. Taking our seats at the table, I couldn’t help but look around at the ornate wooden walls, floors and furnishings. Enjoying our delicious tea and scones (as any Victorian era group would), we listened to our guide take us through what a typical day was like for this home’s original occupants.

After enjoying one last cuppa, we continued the tour on foot, climbing the sturdy winding staircases up and up. Walking through each room and peering through the many windows, I loved seeing the accessories: the steamer trunks fit for world travel, the art and the fireplaces. And the “hidden” toilets. I guess no one was in the mood to see that particular indoor plumbing feature…

We ended the tour at the Carriage House, where we watched a short video on the Flavel family history in Astoria. I also paid my respects to the gift shop on our way out…

Maritime

Strolling along Riverwalk, we found ourselves enjoying the past coming together with the present. Like watching the town’s historic trolley making its way along the water’s edge while the epic bridge quietly guards from above.

We happened upon several historical markers along the walkway, but there’s one that impressed me the most: Maritime Memorial Park. One would expect a maritime city to have such a special and beautiful way of honoring Astorians who died at sea. But seeing two workers adding new plaques made me realize that a life at sea remains a challenging way to make a living.

Astoria’s river-meets-ocean locale was a perfectly picturesque stop for us, before continuing on our way. But I would love to return for a long weekend, just so we could explore a little more. Its beauty and history transcends all seasons. J ⚓️

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