My EPCOT day

How does one visit eleven countries in one day? Not easily. But what about a representation of countries—a circle of neighbors around a small body of water that just happens to find itself in Orlando, Florida?

Part of EPCOT (one of Walt Disney World’s epic theme parks) the World Showcase hosts this neighborhood of international places around its namesake lagoon.

With my family, I’ve had the pleasure of enjoying WDW parks many times over the years, but this would be my first solo visit. Having only one day (roughly 24 hours) available on my timeline, I chose to traverse this particular park.

Why EPCOT? It always reminds me of a world’s fair, but with more permanent structures, and of course, Disney flare. And since I’m a big fan of fairs (and markets and festivals and Disney), this made my narrow-it-down-to-one-park decision a little easier. So I began my one day by stepping into the future…

The future

Extremely visible from just about anywhere in the park, Future World’s Spaceship Earth was my first stop. Since I wasn’t fast enough for Fastpass on this particular trip, I targeted this attraction early in the day so as to minimize my wait time.

I really like the ride through history, particularly as it covers the progress of human communication throughout time, beginning with the drawings of cave dwellers and ending with our prototypes and predictions for the future.

Near the end of the journey, each car’s interactive touch screen allows its travelers to make selections about how they might want to live in the future. Somehow my future self ended up in outer space, but the view of Earth was phenomenal!

For my next Future World stop, it was time to take flight. I made a beeline for Soarin’ inside The Land pavilion. Another very popular attraction, I noted the wait time for the Stand-by line to be 60 minutes. Knowing the wait time approaching noon would only lengthen, I walked into the entrance, preparing to spend a little “me time” on my phone.

Well, I did spend time on my phone—playing an online Soarin’ trivia game with about one hundred other line occupants. Wall screens invited passers by to complete the quick login process, then presented the teams with True/False questions like “The Great Barrier Reef is larger than the Great Wall of China.” Definitely a fun way to pass the time.

As luck would have it, the line operator was looking for a single rider to board immediately, so after raising my hand (and shouting “Me!”), I was routed to my seat. I prepped for takeoff, and up-up-up-and-away we went. Such amazing birds-eye views and music! The Great Wall, the Golden Gate Bridge, waterfalls, plains, all as they appear from above.

The world

I fit in one last Stand-by attraction for the day, this time in Norway. Part of the World Showcase, this Northern European land was my first country stop of the day. The attraction? Frozen, which sounded really good on an 86 degree Fahrenheit day. Another 60-minute wait, but under cover, and with plenty of charming movie décor to admire before boarding the boat ride.

Young movie fans (and their chaperones) will love hearing the songs and seeing animatronic figures from the famed story as they glide along, enjoying a little drop (and maybe a splash of water) at the end.

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A trip to any of the Disney parks wouldn’t be complete without a character photo op. The trick is to queue up to the meeting spot before the Disney celebrity arrives. In Great Britain, I found the line for Alice in Wonderland just beginning, so I quickly took my place.

So very charming, Alice chatted with each guest for a bit, prior to signing autograph books and posing for photos. Watching the exchange between Alice and her fans made time pass quickly as the line progressed. And then it was my turn! She and I had a fun discussion about the Red Queen before smiling for the camera.

At the host country, I timed my visit just right to find a theater seat for an animatronic, cinematic and photographic tour through my nation’s history: The American Adventure. Narrated by famous Americans Benjamin Franklin and Mark Twain, the two took turns weaving our historical events via a chronological timeline.

Along the way, other famous Americans such as Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglas, cultural icon Rosie the Riveter and Native American Chief Joseph, added to the compelling conversations. Inventors like Alexander Graham Bell joined the group too.

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Ending with images covering more contemporary moments, celebrities and events of our time/my time, I found myself truly touched—a little choked up even—but inspired by the messages conveyed during this quick tour of American history.

My early dinner reservation was fast approaching. Eager to stop by each remaining country at least briefly, I made quick visits to the following:

    • China
    • Mexico
    • Canada
    • France
    • Morocco
    • Japan
    • Germany

I’ve had longer visits to these locales during previous vacations, but I was still a bit sad I couldn’t hang out this time—dinner called. Speaking of dining…

The cuisine

Just in case you were wondering when I’d get to Italy, worry no more. My 24-hour visit actually began the prior evening at Italy’s Napoli Ristorante E Pizzeria. Nothing like a delicious Quattro Formaggi (four-cheese) pizza and a glass of vino to make me smile! Excellent service too. I finished off my meal with a delightful tiramisu. Ahhhh…

Between my visits to Norway and Great Britain, I ventured back to Future World’s Fountain View Café. Disney and Starbucks teamed up on this venture, and came up with something fun for fans of both. I stepped outside on the terrace and found a table in the shade where I could enjoy my icy usual and a sweet treat—and a partial view of the fountain.

Toward the end of my day—my last dinner at the park—I returned to Great Britain, and entered the Rose & Crown Dining Room. (There’s a fun pub attached to the restaurant, as well as a fish & chips stand too.)

I’ve enjoyed their fan favorite here before, but this time, I decided on a Scottish inspired salmon dish. A grilled and lightly breaded filet on a bed of veggies and lentils—amazing! Truly delicious. I asked my server to pay my compliments to the chef. I ate every bite. But not to worry; I saved room for dessert: sticky toffee pudding. So heavenly! (And yes, I ate every bite of that too…)

The shopping

Along with the marvelous food, souvenirs are tough to resist here at EPCOT. I made most of my purchases in Italy and Great Britain, but found a fun pair of suspenders in Germany, and a few co branded coffee mugs at the Future World’s Fountain View Café.
And just in case you become concerned about the lack of available space in your suitcase, WDW resorts can help you ship the souvenirs home.

When I returned to the Port Orleans French Quarter Resort for the evening (a fun New Orleans themed WDW resort), I headed to the gift shop. The cast members inventoried my collection of goods, gave me my receipt, and I was good to go! My souvenirs arrived at home in excellent condition about two weeks later.

The fireworks

Have you ever had the chance to enjoy Disney fireworks? In a word: spectacular! I caught the show from one of Italy’s Venetian style bridges, but the event can be seen from anywhere in the park. What a wonderful way to end my day.

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No matter how many times I walk this park, explore the pavilions, or dine at the restaurants, I always leave mentally planning my next EPCOT visit. Conversations with World Showcase cast members—all native to the countries they represent —remind me how enriched I feel, experiencing different cultures.

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So, if you’re a foodie and a Disney fan who enjoys exploring future concepts, walking through fairs and experiencing a bit of wonder from other places, you just might develop a taste for EPCOT. I know I have.

J 🌎🌍🌏

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Tea’s Grand afternoon

Afternoon tea, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways—okay just one way—I can’t pass up the opportunity. No matter where in the world I am. Even in Florida’s hot and sunny weather. All I need is a little shade and some air conditioning, and I’m set. Oh, and just one more thing: Walt Disney World.

The locale

The Garden View Tea Room at the Grand Floridian Resort & Spa is a perfectly comfortable and wonderful place for me to indulge my craving for this historical tea time event.

The décor of this Victorian style resort—considered to be WDW’s flagship accommodation destination—features elegant, turn-of-the-century (previous century 😁) British furnishings that highlights outdoor activities and garden parties of days gone by.

The Tea Room is adjacent to the main lobby, in full view of an adorable garden. The terrace style restaurant was busy, but not hurried. Perfect for relaxing and enjoying a spot of tea…

The tea

The menu offered a handful of choices regarding afternoon tea delectables and their accompanying beverages. I chose the Bedfordshire Tea: finger sandwiches, a scone with jam, clotted cream and lemon curd, a tart (don’t tell the Red Queen! ❤️), macaroons and a strawberry—chocolate covered, of course.

And speaking of chocolate, my tea of choice: Twinings Nutty Chocolate Tea. Yum! I added a glass of Prosecco to round out my gastronomic event. Twinings is the featured brand at the Garden View Tea Room. United Kingdom—EPCOT’s World Showcase locale—sells some of the Tea Room’s choices.

The atmosphere

As I sipped my sparkler while enjoying my treats and English tea (with cream and sugar), I could see other patrons doing the same—relaxed and smiling, each celebrating some special event.

The staff also seemed happy and relaxed, despite their continual tasks. Considering the size and occupancy of the restaurant, I thought this observation to be rather special. Truly, nothing seemed amiss.

As I finished the last bite of my food, Michelle—my server—said “You can sit and enjoy all you like; there’s no rush.” Wow. Not feeling (or made to feel) rushed is a big deal to me.

Alas, time to leave. As I made my way toward the garden in an attempt to admire the flowers, my plans were thwarted by an afternoon thunderstorm. Perhaps a reminder from the Red Queen to leave her favorite dessert alone…

I may not have had the chance that visit to stop and enjoy the roses, but my tea experience at the Garden View Tea Room gave me the perfect opportunity to relax and reflect anyway. I hope some time this summer you’ll have the chance to do the same.

J ☕️

 

Hutchinson Island Zen

Ah, summer—today’s the first day! The very name of the season evokes a Zen feeling. What comes to your mind when you hear the word “Zen?” Meditation, relaxation, calmness? Vacation—a break from the everyday life? Associated with Zen Buddhism, this powerful three-letter word enjoys a positive place in our modern vocabulary.

It has come to describe people, places and things that equate to feelings of clarity and control, brought about by experiencing wonder, beauty and life’s simple pleasures.

These Zen moments can last just long enough for us to catch our breath, recharge our batteries and return to our daily challenges with a bit more energy—a fresher pair of eyes.

For me, Zen equals Hutchinson Island, on Florida’s Atlantic Coast. No matter what I have going on in my life, time spent here in this quite beautiful place always gives me the clarity and calmness I didn’t know I needed until I arrive.

While this locale is very vacation worthy (think long weekend or longer), sometimes I only have a day… but I’ll take it! Time to share my recent island Zen day with you.

Sea life

Cute and cuddly critters like puppies and kitties can give us that warm-and-fuzzy Zen feeling in our hearts almost instantly. But what about H2O critters? One visit to the Florida Oceanographic and Coastal Center’s stingray feeding program with melt your heart and calm your nerves quickly, as you learn how to pet and feed these entertaining rays.

Time for a pop quiz! Rays are a type of:

A) Fish
B) Dolphin
C) Shark

Answer: A) Fish! They’re just a lot flatter then your average finned swimmer. And these Coastal Center residents have their barbs filed down regularly, so there’s no chance for human visitors to be hurt.

My family and I have paid them many visits over the years, and we never tire of interacting with these amazing sea critters.

Along with the rays, rescued sea turtles and game fish enjoy ocean-fed pavilions and lagoons throughout the 57-acre property. The nature trail and visitors center—even a butterfly garden—and several hands-on displays help educate (as they entertain) patrons of all ages.

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Watching this facility grow over the years gives me a good feeling inside too. The employees are friendly, knowledgeable and dedicated to sharing what life is all about for their marine residents.

Past life

Directly across the street from the Coastal Center sits a modern museum with a flare for transportation: the Elliott Museum. Since their invention, classic cars from almost every decade are on display in a garage-type setting.

But before you happen upon these vehicles, you’ll find variations of bicycles as they evolved from styles of yesteryear, leading up to the most significant style of all: the precursor to the automobile. Sterling Elliot was the inventor and manufacturer of this pre-auto contraption. He managed to own quite a few patents, several having to do with modes of transportation. Many of his inventions greet you near the front entrance.

I enjoyed discovering those early bicycles and tricycles—many of their parts made from wood—as I made my way to the temporary exhibit: kites from around the world. I’d never thought of using these quiet, aerodynamic works of art to tell stories or share history, but show-and-tell they did.

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My price of admission to the Elliott Museum included entry to another museum a few miles down the road: the House of Refuge. So down the road I drove.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, walking into this structure was truly a step back in time. Located on one of the island’s backroads, the serenity of this area made it difficult to imagine the building’s once historical purpose: to serve as a haven for shipwrecked sailors.

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But the rocky beach was a reminder to me that the ease and success of navigation was largely dependent on the weather—and at what angle the shore and the ships met.

Beach life

Looking forward to dipping my toes in the sand, I headed north to Jensen Beach. Plenty of sand and shore awaited me, along with a very welcome ocean breeze. Time to stretch my legs!

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I start to relax just seeing this place from the parking lot. As I pass the Sand Dune Café (a nice walk-up by the way!) and head toward the water, I notice the most artful sandcastle I’ve ever seen: a sea monster of sorts 🦑, facing the ocean. Very impressive—kudos to the sculptor!

The monster facing the ocean. As I continued walking along the beach, I remembered some sage advice I hear often whenever I’m visiting the shore: never turn your back on the ocean. At least not when standing at its edge.

Ready for some refreshment and a little late lunch, I head a bit farther along the road to one of my favorite watering holes: Kyle G’s. Lucky for me, there was an available seat at the bar outside that included a perfect ocean view. James the bartender created a wonderful white sangria at my request. I enjoyed it very much, along with a delicious plate of fried oysters. My final Zen moment of the day.

Whatever your plans for summer, I hope you fit in a few activities designed to help you relax and recharge. Safe travels, and enjoy your Zen moments! J 🏖

 

 

 

MOHAI ala Seattle

Always ready and waiting for new patrons, museums share their eclectic collections of recorded history on a variety of objects, events and people in very unique ways. But believe it or not, museums have their own history too.

Quite by accident, I recently discovered one such institution—a favorite from my youth—had pulled up stakes and moved to a new local. And all I did was ask someone for the nearest coffee place…

A few years back, Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry—MOHAI—traded its view of Lake Washington and the recently expanded Evergreen Point Floating Bridge for a view of the Space Needle from the edge of Lake Union. They just needed to dust a few cobwebs off an old but very museum-sized facility.

Kudos to the city for repurposing the historic Naval Reserve Armory building! MOHAI’s new home. This made me wonder about the history of the museum itself. When did it first open its doors? Will its contents spark a memory or two for me? Aside from the new digs (and a coffee shop—with its own entrance ☕️), what else will be new news for me?

Waiting for a friend’s meeting to end, I had a few hours to wander around the area. Desiring to satisfy my curiosity, I pushed off my caffeine fix and walked through the museum’s doors.

A life-altering letter

Handing me my ticket and map, the museum employee suggested I begin my self-guided tour just behind the ginormous photo of Mount Rainier on the second floor. An excellent suggestion, because it provided a chronological starting point with the first people who called this area “home.”

Coveted for its abundance of natural resources, this place attracted explorers, trappers, miners and loggers, ultimately attracting farmers, government—and barons of industry. Many natives and newcomers developed friendly relationships, but it did not take long for the steady arrival of outside people seeking land for themselves to challenge any good will between tribes and settlers.

Studying the photos, artifacts and reenactment videos, I found myself taking a refresher course in my own town’s local history.

Chief Seattle, a prominent leader of his tribe, encouraged his people and other local tribes to sign a treaty penned by those would become the city’s civic leaders. Speaking up for environmental and tribal rights, he nevertheless endorsed the documents that authorized relocation of native tribes to reservations—land set aside for them by the American government.

The US purchased the more desirable land from the tribes. The chief lived out his days on a reservation, some distance from his original home. Part of me wondered why Chief Seattle focused on persuading tribes to accept the treaty rather than fight to keep what was already theirs.

But I think he foresaw that the new US government—friendly now, but with plenty of military and financial resources—would continue to push for the land they wanted, eventually at any cost. He led by example and signed the treaty, peaceably taking the high road. A somber situation for the tribes. A very humbling and life-altering event for all.

A musical fire

A re-enactment of a famous event is one way to make the pages of history come alive. Like with a musical. In this case, one starring inanimate objects: a typewriter, a doll, a glue pot…

The Great Seattle Fire of 1889 occurred Thursday, June 6 of that year, taking down the entire business district, burning all the way to the waterfront.

I remember seeing the glue pot—the catalyst of the great fire—during my very first visit to MOHAI, circa my first grade year. But this lovely little fire starter came to life in front of me today in a whole new way when I entered The Great Seattle Fire Theater.

Singing its heart out, the glue pot shared its side of the story. Other objects joined in, performing for seven minutes, until their individual memories of this hot news event were made known. Talk about seeing things from another point of view! I actually clapped.

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A hometown photographer

Making my way through the very lively, colorful and interactive museum displays, I was entertained by memory triggers—anything that took me back to a classroom, a famous headline or an I-remember! moment. But when I happened upon the temporary exhibit featuring a local photographer, I encountered something very new to me: Seattle on the Spot—the photographs of Al Smith.

Entering the exhibit’s rooms, I was transported in time to around the 1950s, and the African-American community living and working in the Puget Sound region back then.

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I’d not heard of Al Smith before, but I quickly came to appreciate his skills—his eye for a great photo—capturing special occasions and everyday life in a way that made me feel drawn in, like I was there. An amazing photographic journal of his travels and daily encounters. On display until June 17, I’m very glad I caught his work.

An infectious future

Leaving the Al Smith exhibit, history picked up speed for me. From tokens and headlines showcasing the 1962 Seattle World’s Fair, to the civil rights and human rights movements taking place around the region, to beginnings of today’s PC tech—even nods to local companies that became world famous. I was in awe of it all.

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How will today’s headlines find their way into MOHAI’s future displays? What current issues, disasters, laws and discoveries will make such marks on our society as to receive a place inside these walls?

Everyday people going about their lives, careers and plans, stumbling upon—or running purposely toward—such moments in time. Who will take the high road for peace, or protest for justice? Who will be tenacious enough to create new cures, or efficiencies? Who will showcase art in a whole new way?

Only our future voters, researchers, leaders and dreamers can say. I wonder—what will MOHAI have to say about them? J 🎟

 

Crew-sing the cut

Welcome to boating season! In my corner of the world, this is a year-around activity (albeit not tremendously popular in the winter months), but as of the first Saturday in May, it’s official!

Watercraft of every size, shape, color and purpose take to the H2O in droves. Temporary structures sprout up along our lakes, rivers, sounds and oceans, offering you the chance to rent your vision of freedom on the waterways.

Time to celebrate! And what better way to honor the commencement of maritime activities then with a regatta? That’s exactly how Seattle floats—with The Windermere Cup.

Since 1987, Windermere Real Estate brings together racing crew teams from all over the world for a chance to take home The Windermere Cup trophy. While the visiting teams vary from year to year, the University of Washington Huskies represent the home team for this auspicious event.

Fans crowd the narrow land edges of the Arboretum and the Montlake Cut for a chance to witness the festivities. On the water, yacht club members and other boat owners line up along the race course for a first-hand unobstructed view of the athletes in action. And just where did we fit in?

The log booms

Two very long rows of logs floating end to end (anchored in place) served as the boundaries for the race course. These logs also served as the top of our parking spot, as we backed up to one such tree trunk and proceeded to tie up.

In general, the boating community is a friendly and helpful group. Appropriate since each ties up not only to the log boom, but to each other as well. Get-acquainted conversations spring with every tie-up. Those with dinghies assist in the tie-up process, along with shuttling their own guests to and from the shore.

Each boat load of fans throws their own bash, music drifting from almost every vessel. Think one long, thin tailgate party—or “sailgate” as referred to by one of our neighbors.

The races—back in the day

What do spoons, tulips, hatchets and collars have in common? Oars, of course! Specifically racing oars. From spoons to tulips—common boat oar styles of yesteryear, today’s crew teams use the hatchet style oar.

Adjustable collars on the hatchet oars (positioned near the handles) allow coaches to assess the current skill of the rower, then increase the degree of difficulty as the athlete improves. Moving the collar higher up the oar pushes the boat even farther with each stroke.

Training equipment and techniques today are sophisticated and high tech. Years ago, manual labor jobs often took the place of formal offseason conditioning for our crew teams. And then there’s the shells. No longer wooden, modern day racing craft are made of durable synthetic materials featuring built-in seams so the boats can be disassembled for easy transportation.

Since originating in England on the Thames circa 1600s, the evolution of crew racing to the elite and popular sport we know today is highlighted throughout our history by several distinct mile markers—more than the ever-changing boats, oars and exercise programs. One such mile marker occurred during the Great Depression on these very shores.

A few days after our log boom adventure, we enjoyed a walking tour (on land!) honoring The Boys in the Boat and their famous legacy that came to pass pre-WWII. Led by former Husky women’s crew member Melanie Barstow (the “Boys of 1936” tour creator), we traveled through time from the UW’s currentand very modernConibear Shellhouse to the original ASUW Shellhouse on the water’s edge of the Montlake Cut.

A former Naval facility built in 1918—now on the National Register of Historic Places—this humble structure had a dual purpose. It served as a launch and storage for the UW crew teams, and as a shop for the assembly of the world-famous Pocock Racing shells.

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George Pocock himself created his wooden boats under that roof. If these old floor boards could talk, they would be smiling as they told the very true story of how the Husky men’s varsity crew team came together (in a Pocock shell) to win the gold at the ‘36 Berlin Olympics.

The races—present day

Fast forward to modern times, and this year’s opening day contest. Pardon the reference, but this year’s races—22 total—were akin to singing “Row, Row, Row Your Boat”—one race right after the other.

Each lasted between 5 and 9 minutes—each a smooth yet sharp and speedy challenge on the water’s surface, and each marked with evidence of today’s tech and style: wireless headsets for the coxswain and rowers, sleek shells and the latest in lightweight uniforms. The winning teams crossed the finish line with no more than a second or two to spare, or considerably less.

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The parades

When you hear the word “parade,” what comes to mind? Marching bands, cheerleaders, dignitaries, athletes, police and firefighters—and decorated floats? This post crew racing event contained all of the above mentioned elements, moving between the log booms with all the pomp and circumstance of any parade you’ve witnessed on paved city streets.

One noteworthy variation: all watercraft came back through the same course. In other words, any floating parade craft passed by all onlookers twice. No worries if you missed waving at a particular participant; the start and finish line were one in the same.

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The course events ending, all boats proceeded to make their way home in whichever direction necessary. This created a common experience among all commuters: rush hour. Nothing like a little traffic jam to remind us we’re not alone when making our way down the many highways (and waterways) of life.

As we tootled along the no wake zone on our way back home, I wondered what thoughts crew racing fans had that year the UW crew team represented the USA in the ‘36 Summer Olympics. Hope, pride, excitement—my best guesses. Ears glued to their radios, voices harsh from yelling their enthusiasm as “the boys” crossed the finish line first—against all odds.

If only the boys knew their mile marker in the making—their very own and very famous moment in time—how much they continue to be celebrated. Their humble personas might be a bit overwhelmed.

But I think their pride in the continued success of crew racing at their old alma mater, and the celebration of this sport every first Saturday in May, would give them that “swing” feeling in and out of the racing shell, and the knowledge that it all was worth it—and still is. J 🚣‍♀️

 

Where gardens grow

Regarding favorites—favorite garden nursery, favorite bistro, favorite spa, or favorite tea shop—you might picture locations you’ve happened upon during your travels that check off one or two of the above-mentioned categories. Quite recently, I was treated to a day in a place that features all four and more: Windmill Gardens.

You’ll find this five-acre village of classy, unpretentious mercantile in the town of Sumner, Washington. And once we entered the grounds, I couldn’t believe the discoveries we made at every turn.

Garden epic

Plants, flowers, trees, soils and seeds—high and low, plentiful and beautiful—occupying much of the acreage, spilling purposely from the long greenhouse-style buildings into the outside patios. Employees were busy keeping this popular shop tidy, assisting customers and ringing up purchases—and fielding questions.

As I wondered how far their living inventory needed to travel to reach this place, a cashier answered that very question to one of my friends. Only a few miles down the road, their production facilities—25 acres worth—grow all kinds of flowers and greenery.

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Just outside our parking spot, The Village connected the nursery with the smaller but very quaint tea shop, spa and other stores all the way to the courtyard, restaurant and windmill. Brightly colored flowers, plants and water features lead the way to each door.

Gadget unique

Not to be outdone by the greenery and floral displays, garden accessories of every size, shape and color were available for purchase. An impressive selection, to say the least. In need of garden boots, gloves, hats, mats, tools,clothing—fairy furniture? Running low on terrarium supplies? Metal figurines? Bird feeders—and bird baths? Signage? It’s all there.

Because the one thing missing from my backyard was a metal pink flamingo, I made my purchase while my other friend picked out some greenery for her backyard. (I did eye a water feature—maybe next time.)

Gourmet fare

Walking into Tea Madame was a delight to the senses, even before enjoying a free sample. Loose leaf blends sold here—many exclusive to this shop—are also the delicious subjects of this store’s tea tastings (classes). Sounds like flavorful fun to me! Jewelry and even chocolate joined the many different tea accessories on the shelves. It was tough to leave! Ah, but it was time for lunch at the Windmill Bistro.

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It’s difficult for me to pass up crab Mac-n-cheese, so I didn’t. But all of our entrees were flavorful and reasonably priced. This restaurant alone is definitely worthy of a return visit.

Upon learning that the Bistro is also available in the evenings for private events—and that it provides catering for celebrations taking place in the courtyard or adjacent building just outside—I began to make the connection…

Gala flare

Weddings, milestone anniversaries and birthdays, and other special events; I can see how all venues on site come into play to make this place nearly an all-inclusive locale.

Need a gazebo for your nuptials? Check! How about an on-site florist? Done! While the Bella Ragazza Spa & Salon pampers the bridal party, the beautiful grounds and whimsical windmill building accommodate your guests for an enchanting evening of festivities.

I always admire those who possess a green thumb. They have the ability to turn a patch of dirt into a garden, a vase of flowers into a bouquet—even an old appliance into a colorful planter. And now, after my visit to the Windmill Gardens, I’m willing to try just a bit harder to make my living spaces a little more alive. J 🌳

 

FAIR-ly unique fun

There’s a lot of newness this time of year—many discoveries (or rediscoveries) of things tucked away; things—and people—anticipating longer, warmer, sunnier days. And while all seasons have events worth celebrating, spring claims the colorful rebirth of our landscapes. And perhaps a bit more…

For me, tradition dictates my attendance at the state fair each and every fall. Not begrudgingly, I can assure you; I love our giant end-of-summer-beginning-of-autumn-harvest-food-music-fun-filled festive bash just as much as the well over one million annual attendees who visit this grand occasion. Since 1900, the city of Puyallup has played host to The Fair, and since 1990, the Spring Fair.

Hold up—a fair… in the spring? Okay, so it’s been around for almost 30 years now, but it took a bit for me to warm up to the idea. Realizing the parade is daring to pass me by, I purchased tickets online (at a discount for buying early), talked my daughter into spending one of her weekdays off with me, and hit the road, ready to compare spring to fall.

Machines

Upon arrival, my car and wallet were treated to free parking at the fairgrounds’ Blue parking lot; a nice perk for attending the Spring Fair on a weekday.

After clearing the gates and making our way through a familiar maze of structures—one of which sold us our ride tickets—we arrived at our family’s official first fair stop: the roller coaster. Making its debut in 1935 (rebuilt a few times since), The Coaster is our favorite way to kick off our day at the fair.

Meandering through the grounds, we witnessed a mix of things familiar with a dash or two of something new. Something different. Like a parade of monster trucks making their way to the grandstand bullpen. Larger-than-life, loud and knobby tires, these modes of transportation demanded the attention of all those in a hundred-yard radius. Not a planned event, mind you, as far as your traditional parade goes. But totally worth the price of admission!

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Critters

Picture your favorite local fair. What animals come to mind? Cows, horses, hogs, rabbits, chickens…reptiles, marsupials, tropical birds…wait—what? That’s what we uttered as we stumbled into an exhibit under the grandstand: Brad’s World Reptiles. Snapping turtles, albino cobras and alligators—oh my! Not your average petting zoo.

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Camped out between the carnival rides and the food stands, we discovered adorable and colorful critters from down under: kangaroos and wallabies, and multicolored birds that make decorated Easter eggs look plain—all part of the Aussie Kingdom.

To date, I’ve witnessed mostly conventional races: cars, horses, gunnysacks, three-legged… but now, I can chalk one up for unconventional: potbelly pigs. If you’re looking for cuteness overload, this is the event for you! Swifty Swine Productions packs its arena to standing-room-only capacity each and every showtime. Three races per show, these super cute potbellies tear up the sawdust track to reach the coveted prize: an Oreo cookie.

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Flavors

If there’s one rule for attending a fair, it’s this: bring your appetite. Everything from cotton candy to gyros is available, along with beverages galore. We narrowed down our selection to options at the baked potato/panini stand. I chose a traditional baked spud, with plenty of cheese, butter, sour cream and chives (leaving off the bacon bits—after the potbelly races, I just couldn’t…). 🐽

Before calling it a day, we picked up two bakers dozen bags of one fair tradition I will never go without: Fisher Scones. And because every scone deserves a worthy something-to-drink partner, we visited the Original House of Donuts stand for lattes. Oh, and because they jumped into our purchase, a few donuts too.

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Making our way to the new seating area just behind the grandstand, we enjoyed our treats in full view of the monster trucks, resting up for their big show. Also in the vicinity of the grandstand’s backyard, we found the Fred Oldfield Western Heritage & Art Center. Something I’d never really noticed before, even in all the years I’ve been a state fair regular.

There was a class in progress, but not just because of the Spring Fair; this art center is open year around. It is the perfect combination of art reflecting the past, while looking to the future.

What local springtime events, fairs or festivals do you enjoy? Or are you warming up to the thought of attending? Take it from me, don’t let these opportunities—these parades—pass you by. The monster trucks, potbellies and scone makers will thank you. And you just might discover (for yourself) a new tradition. J 🎢